book reviews

Into The Water- Review ***No Spoilers***

 

Into The Water, by Paula Hawkins

Published- May 2, 2017, by Riverhead Books

Source- Book of the Month May Selection

Rating- 3/5

Summary:

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.
Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

Source: Goodreads.com

 

Let me start by saying, I wasn’t a fan of The Girl on The Train. After multiple people told me I HAD to read it, I broke down and bought a copy. Mystery and thrillers aren’t generally my preferred genre but I like a good story, so I gave it a go.

I don’t think I lasted a hundred pages into it. I didn’t like the narrator at all. She was miserable and whiny, not my type. I’ve never been one to quibble over not finishing a book so I just gave it up. I don’t regret my choice and I still haven’t seen the movie.

What made me want to read “Into the Water,” was more of the historical aspect of the so-called “drowning pool,” and its link to the community past and present.

I gave this book a three-star rating for a couple of reasons:

  1. I didn’t hate it.
  2. I finished it, and
  3. I don’t think it was a complete waste of my precious reading time.

I didn’t think the story was incredible, or amazing, or unforgettable. It was decent, not wholly unoriginal, and it held my interest.

There were a few times I felt like I was reading a script for a soap opera, like, is it possible for this many nasty people to all live in the same place? And, when I say nasty, I’m talking about the entire spectrum of nasty. The amount of characters, and, the shifting points-of-view were also very ABC Daytime.

In fact, many people thought that the amount of characters, and POV’s that this novel is told from detracts from the story and made it unnecessarily confusing. I had to go back a couple of times, especially because I started reading it two weeks ago and just picked it back up to finish it today. I didn’t mind the amount of characters, I thought it added somewhat to the suspense factor.

The thing kept me interested wasn’t really the suspense, it was the force that the characters’ memories held over their lives. The size of the cast of characters adds to this aspect of the book as well. Things are told the way a certain character remembers it, only to read another character’s memory that contradicts the first, so which character is remembering correctly, are either of them remembering correctly at all.

This playing on memories, and unreliable characters/narrators, seems to be Paula Hawkins niche. It is certainly relatable; how many times in your own life have you thought, I’m not sure if I remember this or if it was told to me.

Another running theme Hawkins has going on is; what do you really know about the people in your life, community, work, school, etc.? I like that she takes the labels that society imprints people with, and turns them on their head; the seemingly clean, always put together, buttoned-up professional lives in a disgustingly messy house; the couple that seem to have the perfect marriage, no longer speak and sleep in separate bedrooms; the girl who looks and acts like a slut is a prude, and still a virgin.

I think this is important because it enables us to see people beyond what they are superficially, beyond their labels; hopefully not just in fiction, but in real life as well.

In summary, Into The Water, wasn’t awful; with that being said, my expectations were pretty low. I would recommend this to people whom I know enjoy the genres, literary suspense, mystery/thriller. Personally, I probably won’t be reading another one of her books anytime soon.

 

 

 

 

 

Into The Water, by Paula Hawkins

Published- May 2, 2017, by Riverhead Books

Source- Book of the Month May Selection

Rating- 3/5

Summary:

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.
Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

Source: Goodreads.com

 

Let me start by saying, I wasn’t a fan of The Girl on The Train. After multiple people told me I HAD to read it, I broke down and bought a copy. Mystery and thrillers aren’t generally my preferred genre but I like a good story, so I gave it a go.

I don’t think I lasted a hundred pages into it. I didn’t like the narrator at all. She was miserable and whiny, not my type. I’ve never been one to quibble over not finishing a book so I just gave it up. I don’t regret my choice and I still haven’t seen the movie.

What made me want to read “Into the Water,” was more of the historical aspect of the so-called “drowning pool,” and its link to the community past and present.

I gave this book a three-star rating for a couple of reasons:

  1. I didn’t hate it.
  2. I finished it, and
  3. I don’t think it was a complete waste of my precious reading time.

I didn’t think the story was incredible, or amazing, or unforgettable. It was decent, not wholly unoriginal, and it held my interest.

There were a few times I felt like I was reading a script for a soap opera, like, is it possible for this many nasty people to all live in the same place? And, when I say nasty, I’m talking about the entire spectrum of nasty. The amount of characters, and, the shifting points-of-view were also very ABC Daytime.

In fact, many people thought that the amount of characters, and POV’s that this novel is told from detracts from the story and made it unnecessarily confusing. I had to go back a couple of times, especially because I started reading it two weeks ago and just picked it back up to finish it today. I didn’t mind the amount of characters, I thought it added somewhat to the suspense factor.

The thing kept me interested wasn’t really the suspense, it was the force that the characters’ memories held over their lives. The size of the cast of characters adds to this aspect of the book as well. Things are told the way a certain character remembers it, only to read another character’s memory that contradicts the first, so which character is remembering correctly, are either of them remembering correctly at all.

This playing on memories, and unreliable characters/narrators, seems to be Paula Hawkins niche. It is certainly relatable; how many times in your own life have you thought, I’m not sure if I remember this or if it was told to me.

Another running theme Hawkins has going on is; what do you really know about the people in your life, community, work, school, etc.? I like that she takes the labels that society imprints people with, and turns them on their head; the seemingly clean, always put together, buttoned-up professional lives in a disgustingly messy house; the couple that seem to have the perfect marriage, no longer speak and sleep in separate bedrooms; the girl who looks and acts like a slut is a prude, and still a virgin.

I think this is important because it enables us to see people beyond what they are superficially, beyond their labels; hopefully not just in fiction, but in real life as well.

In summary, Into The Water, wasn’t awful; with that being said, my expectations were pretty low. I would recommend this to people whom I know enjoy the genres, literary suspense, mystery/thriller. Personally, I probably won’t be reading another one of her books anytime soon.

 

 

 

 

 

Into The Water, by Paula Hawkins

Published- May 2, 2017, by Riverhead Books

Source- Book of the Month May Selection

Rating- 3/5

Summary:

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.
Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

Source: Goodreads.com

 

Let me start by saying, I wasn’t a fan of The Girl on The Train. After multiple people told me I HAD to read it, I broke down and bought a copy. Mystery and thrillers aren’t generally my preferred genre but I like a good story, so I gave it a go.

I don’t think I lasted a hundred pages into it. I didn’t like the narrator at all. She was miserable and whiny, not my type. I’ve never been one to quibble over not finishing a book so I just gave it up. I don’t regret my choice and I still haven’t seen the movie.

What made me want to read “Into the Water,” was more of the historical aspect of the so-called “drowning pool,” and its link to the community past and present.

I gave this book a three-star rating for a couple of reasons:

  1. I didn’t hate it.
  2. I finished it, and
  3. I don’t think it was a complete waste of my precious reading time.

I didn’t think the story was incredible, or amazing, or unforgettable. It was decent, not wholly unoriginal, and it held my interest.

There were a few times I felt like I was reading a script for a soap opera, like, is it possible for this many nasty people to all live in the same place? And, when I say nasty, I’m talking about the entire spectrum of nasty. The amount of characters, and, the shifting points-of-view were also very ABC Daytime.

In fact, many people thought that the amount of characters, and POV’s that this novel is told from detracts from the story and made it unnecessarily confusing. I had to go back a couple of times, especially because I started reading it two weeks ago and just picked it back up to finish it today. I didn’t mind the amount of characters, I thought it added somewhat to the suspense factor.

The thing kept me interested wasn’t really the suspense, it was the force that the characters’ memories held over their lives. The size of the cast of characters adds to this aspect of the book as well. Things are told the way a certain character remembers it, only to read another character’s memory that contradicts the first, so which character is remembering correctly, are either of them remembering correctly at all.

This playing on memories, and unreliable characters/narrators, seems to be Paula Hawkins niche. It is certainly relatable; how many times in your own life have you thought, I’m not sure if I remember this or if it was told to me.

Another running theme Hawkins has going on is; what do you really know about the people in your life, community, work, school, etc.? I like that she takes the labels that society imprints people with, and turns them on their head; the seemingly clean, always put together, buttoned-up professional lives in a disgustingly messy house; the couple that seem to have the perfect marriage, no longer speak and sleep in separate bedrooms; the girl who looks and acts like a slut is a prude, and still a virgin.

I think this is important because it enables us to see people beyond what they are superficially, beyond their labels; hopefully not just in fiction, but in real life as well.

In summary, Into The Water, wasn’t awful; with that being said, my expectations were pretty low. I would recommend this to people whom I know enjoy the genres, literary suspense, mystery/thriller. Personally, I probably won’t be reading another one of her books anytime soon.

 

 

 

 
Into The Water, by Paula Hawkins
Published- May 2, 2017, by Riverhead Books
Source- Book of the Month May Selection
Rating- 3/5

Summary:
A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return.

With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.

Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.
Source: Goodreads.com

Let me start by saying, I wasn’t a fan of . After multiple people told me I HAD to read it, I broke down and bought a copy. Mystery and thrillers aren’t generally my preferred genre but I like a good story, so I gave it a go.

I don’t think I lasted a hundred pages into it. I didn’t like the narrator at all. She was miserable and whiny, not my type. I’ve never been one to quibble over not finishing a book so I just gave it up. I don’t regret my choice and I still haven’t seen the movie.

What made me want to read “Into the Water,” was more of the historical aspect of the so-called “drowning pool,” and its link to the community past and present.

I gave this book a three-star rating for a couple of reasons:
a. I didn’t hate it.
b. I finished it, and
c. I don’t think it was a complete waste of my precious reading time.

I didn’t think the story was incredible, or amazing, or unforgettable. It was decent, not wholly unoriginal, and it held my interest.

There were a few times I felt like I was reading a script for a soap opera, like, is it possible for this many nasty people to all live in the same place? And, when I say nasty, I’m talking about the entire spectrum of nasty. The amount of characters, and, the shifting points-of-view were also very ABC Daytime.

In fact, many people thought that the amount of characters, and POV’s that this novel is told from detracts from the story and made it unnecessarily confusing. I had to go back a couple of times, especially because I started reading it two weeks ago and just picked it back up to finish it today. I didn’t mind the amount of characters, I thought it added somewhat to the suspense factor.

The thing kept me interested wasn’t really the suspense, it was the force that the characters’ memories held over their lives. The size of the cast of characters adds to this aspect of the book as well. Things are told the way a certain character remembers it, only to read another character’s memory that contradicts the first, so which character is remembering correctly, are either of them remembering correctly at all.

This playing on memories, and unreliable characters/narrators, seems to be Paula Hawkins niche. It is certainly relatable; how many times in your own life have you thought, I’m not sure if I remember this or if it was told to me.

Another running theme Hawkins has going on is; what do you really know about the people in your life, community, work, school, etc.? I like that she takes the labels that society imprints people with, and turns them on their head; the seemingly clean, always put together, buttoned-up professional lives in a disgustingly messy house; the couple that seem to have the perfect marriage, no longer speak and sleep in separate bedrooms; the girl who looks and acts like a slut is a prude, and still a virgin.

I think this is important because it enables us to see people beyond what they are superficially, beyond their labels; hopefully not just in fiction, but in real life as well.

In summary, Into The Water, wasn’t awful; with that being said, my expectations were pretty low. I would recommend this to people whom I know enjoy the genres, literary suspense, mystery/thriller. Personally, I probably won’t be reading another one of her books anytime soon.

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